Girl Scouts of Connecticut will recognize the achievements of Teresa C. Younger of Shelton at the 2013 Breakfast Badge event on Friday, Dec. 6 from 7:30-9 a.m. at The Hartford Club in downtown Hartford.

Teresa C. Younger of Shelton

Younger is executive director of the state Permanent Commission on the Status of Women and a past Girl Scouts of Connecticut board president.

She is being honored for her commitment to advancing the lives of girls and women across the state, while supporting Girl Scouting’s personal and leadership development programs for young women.

Prior to her state position, Younger was the director of affiliate organizational development at the American Civil Liberties Union national office, where she assisted ACLU chapters throughout the country with organization and management issues.

She previously was the first woman and the first African-American to serve as executive director of the ACLU of Connecticut.

Varied experience

Younger has a diverse array of policy and management experience, from corporate philanthropy to youth development.

She recently concluded her role as two-term president of the board of Girl Scouts of Connecticut, which serves nearly 44,000 girls and 18,000 adult members in the state.

Younger serves on the boards of other organizations and recently received the Social Justice Vision Award from the Charter Oak Cultural Center.

Grew up as a Girl Scout

Younger was a Girl Scout while growing up in North Dakota and knows firsthand the impact of Girl Scouting as a Gold Award recipient.

Mary Barneby, CEO of Girl Scouts of Connecticut, said the organization is “honored to recognize [Younger’s] dedication and commitment to girls and women across the state with a specially designed badge.”

Proceeds to boost Scouting

The Breakfast Badge is a ceremonial networking and fund-raising event. Breakfast proceeds will support enrichment, educational, recreational and personal development programs that help girls in kindergarten to 12th grade bring out the best in themselves and their communities.

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